Pinterest.

It’s a rockin’ visual search engine.

You know you need to be on it.

After all, that’s where your readers spend their time.

And, all of the blogging gurus swear by it.

*Psst – Did someone say FREE advertising?!

So, you spent days creating that perfect Pinterest image template. You even watched cool YouTube tutorials that show you how to hide your Pinterest images using weird html code.

You, my friend, are beginning to feel exceptionally badass.

You may also be feeling a wee bit overwhelmed.

Now what?

You need spreadsheets to help organize your Pinterest account.

This video will show you how to organize your Pinterest images using spreadsheets.

In this video, I walk you through how to create your own workbook that’s filled with spreadsheets to help you organize your Pinterest boards, group boards, images, and pinning activities.

And, if videos aren’t your cup of tea (or glass of vino), I’ve also included some basic instructions for creating the same series of spreadsheets below the vid.

[This item is no longer available.] If you don’t want to bother with any of it and just want the little buggers handed to you, the premium version is available for a few bucks. CLICK HERE to go to the No-Fuss Pinterest Board & Pin Manager (formerly Organize Your Pinterest Boards!) product page.

Ditch Pinterest overwhelm! Use spreadsheets to organize your boards & pins.Click To Tweet

Now, here’s the (very raw) video that I promised. Sorry for the terrible lighting – I filmed it waaaay too late last night…

For you lovelies who aren’t into video (and I sooooo relate!), here are some simple instructions on how to create the same spreadsheets.

But first – before we dive in – it’s important that you have a basic understanding of how to navigate around in Google Sheets and/or Excel. If you are a total newb, please download my FREE From Spreadsheet Virgin to Goddess in 30 Minutes prior to embarking on any of this Pinterest spreadsheet stuff.

We’re on the same page now? Sweet! Here’s how to recreate these spreadsheets.

*Note that these instructions are high-level and are provided using Google Sheets on a Mac. If you are using Excel or a pc, there will be subtle differences. If you run into any troubles or can’t figure something out, please leave a comment at the end of this post – it’s the quickest way to get a response! This also applies for my premium spreadsheet offerings. Thanks!

Step 1: Create a spreadsheet called ‘My Pinterest Boards’.

This spreadsheets is intended to help you organize your own Pinterest boards.

It makes it easier to compose board descriptions, identify the ways that your boards may not consistently reflect your brand, and provide useful information at a glance about collaborators, board categories, etc.

Enter these column headings in row 1, and note that the stuff in parenthesis indicates the type of answers you’ll be entering:

  • Board Name
  • Category (answers: Pinterest’s bazillion category options) *Psst – The premium version has these pre-populated in a drop-down list for you
  • Secret (answers: yes, no)
  • Collaborators
  • Description

All of these goodies can be located if you click the ‘edit’ button on each of your Pinterest boards.

I told you this would be simple!

Now, fill ‘er out for all of your boards!

After creating this spreadsheet, I realized that my board names needed work and my descriptions could use more key words to be easier for others to locate organically. Armed with this information – which was easier for me to see in a spreadsheet than on a cluttered Pinterest profile page – I was able to successfully brand my boards in minimal time. Why not do the same?

Woo-hoo! Yay for simple spreadsheets!!!

Step 2: Create a spreadsheet called ‘Group Boards’.

This spreadsheet is intended to help you organize all of the logistics for joining Pinterest group boards, generate content that’s appropriate for said boards, and verify that etiquette specific to said boards is being followed.

Enter these column headings in row 1, and note that the stuff in parentheses indicates the type of answers you’ll be entering:

  • Board Name (I like to link to the board)
  • Board Owner (I like to link to the owner’s website)
  • Board Owner’s Handle (I like to link to the owner’s Pinterest profile)
  • # of Followers…
  • # of Contributors…
  • # of Pins…
  • …on this Date (note the date that you record the above info, for your reference)
  • Contributor Status (answers: I’m in!, Waiting for a response, Rejected, Haven’t reached out yet)
  • Contact Attempts – Details (briefly describe what you did when you requested to join a group board…useful stuff if you need to contact the group board’s owner using a different method)
  • How to Get Added (briefly enter the group board’s rules for joining)
  • Board Rules to Note
  • Type of Pins to Post
  • Optimal Posting Quantity & Frequency
  • Notes

Now, fill this out for each and every group board to which you either contribute or would like to contribute.

Step 3: Create a spreadsheet called ‘My Site’s Pinnable Images’.

This spreadsheet is intended to house links to all of your pinnable images so that scheduling is majorly simplified.

Enter these column headings in row 1, and note that the stuff in parentheses indicates the type of answers you’ll be entering:

  • Link to Image’s Source (blog post, etc)
  • Image ID or Description (describe the image if there are multiple pinnable images for a given post)
  • Original Posting Date (of the blog post)
  • Evergreen Content (answers: yes, no)
  • Type of Pin, Category, etc.
  • Best Board to Post Pin (choose where this pin belongs – you will need to insert additional columns if the image will get pinned more than once)
  • Comments

Now, fill this out for all of your Pinterest images in each and every blog post, including your hidden images*. This may take a while, but it will make scheduling your pins easier, especially if you are doing it without the aid of a scheduling app.

Step 4: Optional – Create a spreadsheet called ‘[insert board name] Images’.

This spreadsheet is intended to keep individual boards organized and to make it easy to plan new pins.

Just look at the spreadsheet you created in ‘Step 3’ and transfer over any image URLs, etc., that belong on the relevant board.

Note that you may be able to skip this step altogether if you are using a scheduling app like Tailwind or BoardBooster.

Enter these column headings in row 1, noting that the stuff in parentheses indicates the type of answers you’ll be entering:

  • Link to Image’s Source (blog post, etc)
  • Image ID or Description (describe the image if there are multiple pinnable images for a given post)
  • Original Pin Date
  • Evergreen Content (answers: yes, no)
  • Comments

Now, fill this out for each of your boards.

FYI, you will undoubtedly have to duplicate/copy this particular spreadsheet a bazillion times (once for each board that you’ll be pinning your own images to). Now, this is going to clutter the hell out of your workbook, so definitely hide tabs if you don’t want to look at a crazy workbook.

Step 5: Format your spreadsheets.

Now it’s time to make your spreadsheets look pretty.

The spreadsheets in the video – and the updated versions of those spreadsheets that I’m offering up for $7 – were simply formatted.

Here is a list of what I did to format these spreadsheets:

  1. Changed the alignment of the text;
  2. Wrapped the text;
  3. Resized the columns;
  4. Added color to the column headers;
  5. Changed the header text color;
  6. Created the drop-down lists using the ‘data validation’ feature;
  7. Changed the font;
  8. Resized the font; AND
  9. Froze the first row and column.

If you need assistance formatting your own spreadsheets, check out this post (primarily for Excel users) and/or the section on formatting in From Spreadsheet Virgin to Goddess in 30 Minutes.

Now, use the darn spreadsheets!

How you use these spreadsheets is your call, of course.

I would suggest using them to help you evaluate how you brand your boards, reduce overwhelm in joining group boards, and schedule your pins to all relevant boards. At least that’s what I have begun doing and will continue to do as I further develop my Pinterest account.

Anyway you cut it, though, organized systems can reduce or even eliminate redundancy.

Less redundancy = more efficiency. Rad, no?

Ditch Pinterest overwhelm! Use spreadsheets to organize your boards & pins.Click To Tweet

I’d love to hear from you, now. How do you organize your Pinterest boards, be it with spreadsheets, an app, or the like? Do you have any tips or questions? Please share below!

[This item is no longer available.] *Psst – if you’d like to snag the (updated) premium versions of the spreadsheets that we created together in the video, CLICK HERE. Thanks again! Til next time…

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